Curriculum for Excellence: Values, Purposes and Principles

Curriculum for Excellence

Source

Values

Wisdom, justice, compassion and integrity: the words which are inscribed on the mace of the Scottish Parliament have helped to define values for our democracy.

It is one of the prime purposes of education to make our young people aware of the values on which Scottish society is based and so help them to establish their own stances on matters of social justice and personal and collective responsibility. Young people therefore need to learn about and develop these values. The curriculum is an important means through which this personal development should be encouraged.

To achieve this, the curriculum:

  • should enable all young people to benefit from their education, supporting them in different ways to achieve their potential
  • must value the learning and achievements of all young people and promote high aspirations and ambition
  • should emphasise the rights and responsibilities of individuals and nations. It should help young people to understand diverse cultures and beliefs and support them in developing concern, tolerance, care and respect for themselves and others
  • must enable young people to build up a strong foundation of knowledge and understanding and promote a commitment to considered judgement and ethical action
  • should give young people the confidence, attributes and capabilities to make valuable contributions to society

In essence, it must be inclusive, be a stimulus for personal achievement and, through the broadening of pupils’ experience of the world, be an encouragement towards informed and responsible citizenship.

Purposes of the curriculum from 3 -18

Our aspiration for all children and for every young person is that they should be successful learners, confident individuals, responsible citizens and effective contributors to society and at work. By providing structure, support and direction to young people’s learning, the curriculum should enable them to develop these four capacities. The curriculum should complement the important contributions of families and communities.

With support from education authorities and schools, teachers will have the task of providing activities which will enable each learner to develop to their full potential in the four capacities. Much of what is needed already exists, but it also requires clear guiding principles to assist teachers and schools in their practice and as a basis for continuing review, evaluation and improvement. These principles will apply to the curriculum at national, education authority, school and individual levels.

Principles for curriculum design

Challenge and enjoymentYoung people should find their learning challenging, engaging and motivating. The curriculum should encourage high aspirations and ambitions for all. At all stages, learners of all aptitudes and abilities should experience an appropriate level of challenge, to enable each individual to achieve his or her potential. They should be active in their learning and have opportunities to develop and demonstrate their creativity. There should be support to enable young people to sustain their effort.
BreadthAll young people should have opportunities for a broad, suitably-weighted range of experiences. The curriculum should be organised so that they will learn and develop through a variety of contexts within both the classroom and other aspects of school life.
ProgressionYoung people should experience continuous progression in their learning from 3 to 18 within a single curriculum framework. Each stage should build upon earlier knowledge and achievements. Young people should be able to progress at a rate which meets their needs and aptitudes, and keep options open so that routes are not closed off too early.
DepthThere should be opportunities for young people to develop their full capacity for different types of thinking and learning. As they progress, they should develop and apply increasing intellectual rigour, drawing different strands of learning together and exploring and achieving more advanced levels of understanding.
Personalisation and choiceThe curriculum should respond to individual needs and support particular aptitudes and talents. It should give each young person increasing opportunities for exercising responsible personal choice as they move through their school career. Once they have achieved suitable levels of attainment across a wide range of areas of learning the choice should become as open as possible. There should be safeguards to ensure that choices are soundly based and lead to successful outcomes.
CoherenceTaken as a whole, children’s learning activities should combine to form a coherent experience. There should be clear links between the different aspects of young people’s learning, including opportunities for extended activities which draw different strands of learning together.
RelevanceYoung people should understand the purposes of their activities. They should see the value of what they are learning and its relevance to their lives, present and future.

Although all should apply at any one stage, the principles will have different emphases as a young person learns and develops. So, for example, the need for breadth will apply very strongly in the earlier stages, to ensure that a child will gain knowledge and understanding across a wide range of areas of learning. More options for specialisation will be available later, once essential outcomes have been achieved. The nature of choice will also change as a child develops, for example starting with choices in play activities, moving through choices in topics and contexts for learning and eventually reaching opportunities for decisions between programmes which may have implications for subsequent careers.

There will need to be sufficient flexibility in the way in which teaching and learning is managed to find the right blend and balance for each young person for their particular stage and circumstances. To enhance opportunities and allow greater personalisation of learning, schools will need to look beyond their own expertise and resources so that their students can have access to suitable provision. This may be through technologies to make connections between learners and teachers at a distance, or partnerships with other schools and colleges.

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Heading: Impact of technological developments

Planning

Experiences and Outcomes from Technological Developments in Society contexts:

…the relationship between key scientific principles and technological developments…TCH 3-01a

…traditional with contemporary production methods to assess their contribution in the world around me and explain the impact of related technological changes…TCH 4-01a

…current trend of technological advance in Scotland or beyond, I can debate the short- and long-term possibilities of the technological development becoming a reality…TCH 4-01b

…possible future impact of new and emerging technologies on economic prosperity and the environment…TCH 4-01c

…the implications and ethical issues arising from technological developments for individuals and societies…TCH 3-02a

…materials, processes or designs in my local community to consider and discuss their environmental, social and economic impact…TCH 4-02a

Leading onto Computing Science National Outcomes and Assessments:

N4 (SDD O3.3)
Produce a short factual report on a contemporary software-based application by:

  • Describing its impact on the environment or society.

N5 (ISDD O2.4/5)
Consider the factors involved in the design and implementation of an information system by:

  • Describing its legal implications
  • Describing its impact on the environment

(i) The Environment: resources

Textbook Sources

Computing and ICT Level 3: Chapter 7 The Green Machine?

Computing and ICT Level 4: Chapter 2 The Computing Technology, the Economy and the Environment?

Computing Science National 5: Chapter 11 The law and the Environment

Website Sources

Government: Environment Agency (UK)

Information: Preventing illegal e-waste export

News: Hazardous waste exporters must pay six figure sum

Video: Tackling illegal e-waste export

Government: Scottish Environmental Protection Agency

Information: Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment

News: Taiwan plans to build factory from e-waste

Wiki: Green Computing

(ii) The Economy: resources

(iii) Politics: resources

(iv) The Law

Technological Developments in Society

Source

Experiences and Outcomes for Technological developments in society within Curriculum for Excellence.

Early First Second Third Fourth
I enjoy playing with and exploring technologies to discover what they can do and how they can help us.

By exploring and using technologies in the wider world, I can consider the ways in which they help.

I can compare traditional with contemporary production methods to assess their contribution in the world around me and explain the impact of related technological changes.

I can work with others to generate, discuss and develop imaginative ideas to create a product of the future.

When exploring technologies in the world around me, I can use what I learn to help to design or improve my ideas or products.

From my studies of technologies in the world around me, I can begin to understand the relationship between key scientific principles and technological developments.

Having investigated a current trend of technological advance in Scotland or beyond, I can debate the short- and long-term possibilities of the technological development becoming a reality.

By exploring current news items of technological interest, I have raised questions on the issues and can share my thoughts.

I can investigate how an everyday product has changed over time to gain an awareness of the link between scientific and technological developments.

I can debate the possible future impact of new and emerging technologies on economic prosperity and the environment.

Within and beyond my place of learning, I can reduce, re-use and recycle resources I use, to help care for the environment.

Throughout all my learning, I take appropriate action to ensure conservation of materials and resources, considering the impact of my actions on the environment.

Having analysed how lifestyle can impact on the environment and Earth’s resources, I can make suggestions about how to live in a more sustainable way.

From my studies of sustainable development, I can reflect on the implications and ethical issues arising from technological developments for individuals and societies.

I can examine a range of materials, processes or designs in my local community to consider and discuss their environmental, social and economic impact, discussing the possible lifetime cost to the environment in Scotland or beyond.

I can investigate the use and development of renewable and sustainable energy to gain an awareness of their growing importance in Scotland or beyond.

Technologies: Assessing Progress and Achievement Professional Learning Resource

Source

This resource supplements the advice in the Principles and Practice paper for technologies to support practitioners in capturing what children and young people have achieved as a result of learning related to experiences and outcomes from early to third curriculum levels in technologies.

PDF file: Assessing progress and achievement in technologies (427 KB)

See also:

PDF file: Monitoring and tracking progress and achievement in the broad general education (421 KB)

Computing Science Contexts for Developing Technological Skills and Knowledge

Source

Experiences and Outcomes for Computing Science within Curriculum for Excellence.

Early First Second Third Fourth
I am developing my knowledge and use of safe and acceptable conduct as I use different technologies to interact and share experiences, ideas and information with others.

I am developing my knowledge and use of safe and acceptable conduct as I use different technologies to interact and share experiences, ideas and information with others.

By considering ways to protect technological devices, I can act safely and responsibly when selecting and using different technologies to communicate and collaborate.

I can work with others to plan and use a learning group for sharing experiences, ideas and information within a secure online environment.

I can compare different forms of security software to gain knowledge and understanding of their functions in protecting contemporary technologies.

I can build a digital solution which includes some aspects of multimedia to communicate information to others.

I can integrate different media to create a digital solution which allows interaction and collaboration with others.

Having gained knowledge and understanding of the components of a computer, I can make an informed choice when deciding on the system required for a specific purpose.

Through research, I can gain knowledge of computer systems or emerging technologies to understand their differing features and consider their suitability for the world of work.

I am developing problem-solving strategies, navigation and co-ordination skills, as I play and learn with electronic games, remote control or programmable toys.

I am developing problem-solving strategies, navigation and co-ordination skills, as I play and learn with electronic games, remote control or programmable toys.

Using appropriate software, I can work collaboratively to design an interesting and entertaining game which incorporates a form of control technology or interactive multimedia.

Using appropriate software, I can work individually or collaboratively to design and implement a game, animation or other application.

By learning the basic principles of a programming language or control technology, I can design a solution to a scenario, implement it and evaluate its success.

I can create graphics and animations using appropriate software which utilise my skills and knowledge of the application.

I can use features of software to create my own animation which can then be used to create an animated sequence.